Choosing To Apply In An Early Application Program Is A Matter For Your Head And Your Heart-polartec

Self-Improvement Applying Early can have a major impact on your college admissions results. So before you decide to do that, you need to understand what the programs are, as well as the implications for your choosing to participate in one or more of them. Basically, there are four kinds of early application programs: 1. EARLY ACTION (EA) In this non-binding program, you apply by the 1st to 15th of November and receive an admissions decision by the middle of December. You can be admitted, deferred or denied admission. If admitted, you don’t have to reply until May 1 of the following year. EA colleges do not have any restrictions regarding how many other early applications you submit. A few colleges offer EA-II, with a due date sometime in January and admission notice about six weeks later. 2. RESTRICTED EARLY ACTION (REA) (AKA, Early Action, Single Choice) This is another non-binding program used most notably by Stanford University and Yale, where you apply by November 1 and hear back from the schools by the middle of December. Like EA programs, you can be admitted, deferred or denied admission. The difference between REA and regular EA is that you may not apply Early Action or Early Decision to any other colleges. If admitted, you don’t have to reply until May 1 of the following year. 3. EARLY DECISION (ED) In this binding contract application program, you apply by the 1st to 15th of November and receive your admissions decision by the middle of December. You can be admitted, deferred or denied admission, but if admitted you are legally bound to attend that school if you accept their admission offer. Like REA programs, you may not apply Early Action or Early Decision to any other colleges. A few colleges offer ED-II, with a due date sometime in January and admission notice about six weeks later. 4. ROLLING ADMISSION Some colleges offer freshman applicants an application program in which applications are accepted, evaluated and decided upon as they are received (from as early as September until a final deadline sometimes as late as the following summer). Whenever you are accepted, you still have until May 1 to decide whether or not you want to attend the school. You can also apply early to any other colleges you like. Just so you know, transfer applicants are ineligible for early application programs. Here are some important implications of applying early that you should be aware of: – Under certain circumstances applying Early Decision can increase your chances of being accepted by a college. However, applying ED shouldn’t be done as an admissions tactic, but rather as a decision based on the fact that you’ve fallen in love with a school. This is where your heart .es into play. If you apply Early Decision and get accepted, you can say no to the acceptance, but once you say yes, that’s the end of the admissions game for you. There’s no turning back. – Applying Early Decision can temporarily or permanently stop you from carefully considering other colleges. If you apply ED, you can’t apply to any other college until you’ve heard whether not you’ve been accepted, deferred or rejected by that college. – Applying Early Decision is not a good idea if you are not a .petitive applicant for a college. Students who are accepted in the ED process tend to be students who fall into the "admissible range" of previously accepted students. You can find that information on college admissions websites. – Applying Early Decision may not be a good idea if you need financial aid. If you are admitted ED you lose the opportunity to .pare financial aid packages, especially when it .es to merit scholarship monies. – In general, there are few downsides for applying Early Action to a college, but students whose academic records and test scores are below the average accepted applicant range are usually better off waiting to apply regular decision. Even more, waiting to apply regular decision gives you the opportunity to potentially present better grades, possibly higher test scores and also identify important, new developments in your activities. If you’re a little overwhelmed by all this, take a deep breath and begin using your head:, spend some time identifying the colleges you like best, determine whether they offer an early application program and which type it is, evaluate the pros and cons of applying early and then decide if an early program is a good choice for you. Copyright (c) 2010 Marjorie Hansen Shaevitz About the Author: 相关的主题文章: